Country Blues

by Preacher Boy

Released 2016
Coast Road Records
Released 2016
Coast Road Records
Raw, powerful, foot-stomping interpretations of country blues classics as only Preacher Boy can deliver them. Accompanied solely by his 1936 National Resophonics, the Alt Blues pioneer pounds out songs by Bukka White, Blind Willie Johnson, and more.
NOTES
With one boot in the past and one square in the present, Preacher Boy delivers the country blues in his own inimitable fashion. The album was recorded over two nights in what was once the old Meadowood Lodge, hidden high and away in the redwood trees of the Santa Cruz Mountains. There were no overdubs or edits—what you hear is what was played. These eight songs stand as a rich (yet inevitably incomplete) representation of some of the key influences that have defined Preacher Boy's long career—Bukka White, Blind Willie Johnson, Mississippi John Hurt, and more. Fittingly, the album was released November 12th—Bukka White's birthday. Preacher Boy accompanies himself with just his 1936 National Resophonics, and a harmonica on one song.

The album cover artwork is integral to the experience of the music. The work—entitled "Home"—is by visual artist Amy Marinelli (www.amymarninelli.com), and is a powerful and unique depiction of the building and surrounding grounds where Country Blues was recorded.

Mixed and mastered with Jeremy Cross.

Preacher Boy was one of the first modern artists to be classified as “Alternative Blues," and the label continues to apply. For almost a quarter of a century Preacher Boy has been both honoring and redefining the country blues tradition. From his debut release on Blind Pig Records (Preacher Boy and The Natural Blues, 1995) to his latest release (Country Blues, 2016), the core Preacher Boy sound has always drawn on powerful roots—--vocals that call to mind the likes of Blind Willie Johnson and Captain Beefheart, slide guitar and fingerpicking styles that channel the rhythms of Bukka White and the bounce of Mississippi John Hurt, and richly crafted lyrics that have drawn comparisons to Bob Dylan, Townes Van Zandt, and Tom Waits.

The album completes a circle of a kind, with Preacher Boy returning to where it all began for him—the country blues.