Preacher Boy

Preacher Boy was one of the first modern artists to be classified as “Alternative Blues," and the label continues to apply. For nearly a quarter of a century—and across eleven albums and counting—Preacher Boy has been both honoring and redefining the country blues tradition through his darkly poetic lyrics, the unmistakable sound of his National Resophonic slide guitar work, and the raw urgency of his ragged baritone voice.

“The Rumble Strip” is Preacher Boy’s latest release, and it’s as funky and hard-hitting as anything he’s yet done. The album is a genre-defying collection of disruptive 21st-century Alt. Blues that pairs old-school Americana ingredients such as National slide guitar, banjo, harmonica, upright bass, and Telecaster, with wicked trash can drums, spooky organ, and a rich tapestry of found sounds and sonic effects.

Beginning with his debut release on Blind Pig Records in 1995, the core Preacher Boy sound has always drawn on powerful roots—rough-edged vocals that call to mind Blind Willie Johnson and Captain Beefheart, slide guitar and fingerpicking styles that channel the rhythms of Bukka White and Mississippi John Hurt, and richly crafted lyrics that have drawn comparisons to the likes of Bob Dylan, Townes Van Zandt, and Tom Waits.

Throughout his career Preacher Boy has always defied easy categorization, while at the same time racking up accolades from the likes of Rolling Stone, Blues Revue, Sing Out, and more. The music press has had a field day over the years coming up with ways to describe Preacher Boy’s singular sound:

"Preacher Boy is somewhat like Keb’ Mo’ in his jazzing up of Delta blues styles, but with a more contemporary sound akin to Kelly Joe Phelps or Chris Whitley. The best cuts highlight his wonderful work on National Steel." —Rolling Stone

“Preacher Boy might be a young white boy singing the blues, but think Tom Waits and Captain Beefheart more than Led Zeppelin and Bad Company, and throw in some Townes Van Zandt and Gillian Welch as well. —All-Music Guide

“Country blues that marry Nick Cave, Robert Johnson, Woody Guthrie and Tom Waits, honeymoon in the barroom with accordions and banjos and line the wedding bed with sheets of mutant folk, deviant campfire country and beatnik jazz.” —Melody Maker

The UK's legendary MOJO magazine may have said it best when they wrote simply that, "Preacher Boy is a songwriter of startling originality."